Stained Glass Gallery

The window
The window "Christ Ascending To Heaven" is situated above the altar. It is in memory of Archibald M. Kains and his wife, Mary Hicks. It was installed in 1937 after the Chancel area was enlarged. The manufacturer was Robert McCausland of Toronto. Archie was born in Glengarry County on the Ottawa River. His wife was born in Huron County. As a young man Archie headed for south western Ontario and became a distiller and a merchant at Union near St. Thomas. In 1862 he with his wife and young children, settled on a 200 acre farm two miles west of Byron on what is now known as Kains Road. This farm, called Riverbow Farm, was the home of four generations of the family - a centennial farm. Archie was a pioneer member of St. Anne's Church, and worked hard to accomplish the rebuilding of the neglected little chapel in 1877 and to have it properly consecrated by Bishop Isaac Hellmuth in 1878.
The Nativity window was donated by George Cotton in memory of his parents, William and Sarah. It shows Joseph, Mary and the baby Jesus with a sheep and cow looking on.
The inscription reads
The Nativity window was donated by George Cotton in memory of his parents, William and Sarah. It shows Joseph, Mary and the baby Jesus with a sheep and cow looking on. The inscription reads "And the Word Was Made Flesh and Dwelt Among Us." This was installed in 1964, manufactured by Robert McCausland of Toronto. The Cottons lived on and farmed a long but narrow 100 acre farm, extending from Base Line Road to Southdale Road. Active and generous in the church, George also donated the iron gates at St. Anne's Church and the former tiling down the aisle.
The window has the inscription
The window has the inscription "Greater Love Hath No Man Than This" and shows Christ carrying His Cross. It is situated in the Chancel almost above the organ on the east side. It is in memory of Frederick Kains who was the fifth child of Archibald and Mary Kains. He was born on Riverbow Farm where he worked with his brothers to produce dairy cattle and field crops. He married Elizabeth Shearme, who with her sister, Jane, were faithful workers at St. Anne's. Fred himself was the first custodian of St. Anne's cemetery (1926-1933) and was rector's warden from 1927-1932. Fred's farm was an extension of Riverbow Farm facing on what is now Shore Road. In 1914, he sold his farm to Herbert Wickerson and built a home at the west end of Byron. The manufacturer of the window was Robert McCausland of Toronto.
This is the oldest memorial window in the church, probably installed in 1878. Given by a grateful congregation, the window provides a permanent reminder of the importance of Dr. Henry Hall, and the entire Hall family, in the history of the church.Henry Hall stained glass window

Henry was the fifth (and youngest) child of Cyrenius and Mary Hall, who settled in what later became Byron. From about 1845 to 1857, the hamlet was known as Hall's Mills. The Hall family were the moving spirits in the building of St. Anne's.

After Henry Hall became a doctor, and while still a young man, he contracted tuberculosis. Hoping to benefit by a change of climate, he embarked on an ocean voyage accompanied by his brother, Cyrenius (junior). Henry died in Peru at the age of 27, leaving a substantial bequest to St. Anne's. The money was used for much- needed renovations, and saved the building from ruin.

The Henry Hall window was originally the chancel window, and held a place of prominence at the front of the church. In 1937, when further rebuilding was undertaken, including extension of the chancel, the window was placed on the east wall of the nave. Fortunately skilled workmen were able to repair the damage which occurred at that time. This accounts for several segments of glass which differ from the original.

The inscription on the window reads:
This is the oldest memorial window in the church, probably installed in 1878. Given by a grateful congregation, the window provides a permanent reminder of the importance of Dr. Henry Hall, and the entire Hall family, in the history of the church.Henry Hall stained glass window Henry was the fifth (and youngest) child of Cyrenius and Mary Hall, who settled in what later became Byron. From about 1845 to 1857, the hamlet was known as Hall's Mills. The Hall family were the moving spirits in the building of St. Anne's. After Henry Hall became a doctor, and while still a young man, he contracted tuberculosis. Hoping to benefit by a change of climate, he embarked on an ocean voyage accompanied by his brother, Cyrenius (junior). Henry died in Peru at the age of 27, leaving a substantial bequest to St. Anne's. The money was used for much- needed renovations, and saved the building from ruin. The Henry Hall window was originally the chancel window, and held a place of prominence at the front of the church. In 1937, when further rebuilding was undertaken, including extension of the chancel, the window was placed on the east wall of the nave. Fortunately skilled workmen were able to repair the damage which occurred at that time. This accounts for several segments of glass which differ from the original. The inscription on the window reads: "In Memory of Henry Hall MD. Born at Hall's Mills on April 3rd, 1836, died in Peru on January 1, 1863. Leaving a bequest for the completion of the Church at his native place." At the bottom of the window are the words: "The Memory of the Just is Blessed."
[written by: Kathleen M. Hart Ellis]Suffer the little children stained glass window

The window
[written by: Kathleen M. Hart Ellis]Suffer the little children stained glass window The window "Suffer The Little Children To Come Unto Me" is situated on the west side of the church. It was installed 1966 in memory of the parents of Kathleen Hart Ellis and Frances Hart Waring. Our great-grandmother, Mrs. Stephen Alger Hart, a widow, and her son, James, came from England in 1860 and settled on the north-west comer of Wonderland and Commissioners Road. From there, she walked to the little Anglican Church at Hall's Mills, which later became St. Anne's Church of Byron. Her grandson, William Robert Hart, married Sarah Matilda Wright in 1909 and they purchased a home in Byron on Commissioners Road West. William was a lay-reader of the Anglican Church and Sarah a soloist. There is a little story about this window when it was being designed. The original drawing was sent from the Toronto glass firm to our rector at that time, the Reverend Canon Robert Mills, for approval. Knowing of my interest in art, the rector showed it to me, and I disapproved. The dove was crowded up into the border at the top of the window and appeared to be hanging there by its wings, and the child kneeling at the feet of Christ had a right foot on a left leg! Needless to say, the design was returned to Toronto and corrected. The manufacturer of the window was Robert McCausland of Toronto.
The window which shows our Lord as the Good Shepherd, was given by Bert and Muriel Foyston as a memorial to Charles & Eliza Hayward, Muriel's parents. Muriel was a long-time resident of Byron and a loved member of St. Anne's Church since 1920. Bert was rector's warden from 1933-1937.

The Haywards visited Canada twice. On each occasion, they attended St. Anne's and were always warmly welcomed by the rector, who was then the Reverend V.M. Durnford.

The window bears the inscription,
The window which shows our Lord as the Good Shepherd, was given by Bert and Muriel Foyston as a memorial to Charles & Eliza Hayward, Muriel's parents. Muriel was a long-time resident of Byron and a loved member of St. Anne's Church since 1920. Bert was rector's warden from 1933-1937. The Haywards visited Canada twice. On each occasion, they attended St. Anne's and were always warmly welcomed by the rector, who was then the Reverend V.M. Durnford. The window bears the inscription, "I am the Good Shepherd." The Foystons chose the "Good Shepherd" because of the strength and beauty of the magnificent metaphor describing Christ's care, concern and love for mankind. Installed in 1937, the window was manufactured by Robert McCausland of Toronto.
The window entitled
The window entitled "I Am The Resurrection And The Life" is situated in the Chancel area on the west side. It was given in memory of Isabella and Mary Kains. It shows Christ ascending with holes in his hands and feet. Both these women lived most of their lives at Riverbow Farm. Later they lived at a house they called "Riverbow Lodge" together with their brothers William and Alfred who donated this memorial window in their memories. They were devout members of St. Anne's Church. Isabella died in 1923 and Mary in 1927.
In 1988, a memorial window to Florence and Bill Lang, was installed in the transom of the entrance doors in the Church. The window faces the street and contains the symbol of St. Anne's, which is a lily in the form of a cross.

The memorial was given by the family and friends of Florence & Bill Lang.

Glass from the original transom window was used for the decorative red, gold, green and blue glass around the edges.
The window was made by Edwards Glass of London.
In 1988, a memorial window to Florence and Bill Lang, was installed in the transom of the entrance doors in the Church. The window faces the street and contains the symbol of St. Anne's, which is a lily in the form of a cross. The memorial was given by the family and friends of Florence & Bill Lang. Glass from the original transom window was used for the decorative red, gold, green and blue glass around the edges. The window was made by Edwards Glass of London.
The window in memory of Alan C. Shepherd was installed in 1976, given by his family. The inscription reads
The window in memory of Alan C. Shepherd was installed in 1976, given by his family. The inscription reads "For I Have Given You An Example." The theme of the window is Service, thought to be appropriate in view of the life of humble Christian service rendered by this dearly-loved, man. The Biblical theme shows Christ washing the feet of His disciples at the Last Supper. The border contains the cardinal, wild rose, the trillium and dogwood. The ventilator section of the window has in the centre the crest of St. Anne's with a closed black-bound Bible to one side, and a Prayer Book in its red colour on the other side. The books are meant to suggest the working tools of the Layreader in the Church in recognition of the office which Al Shepherd held for many devoted years. The window was designed by and the glass parts made by G. Maile of Canterbury, England. Edward Glass Company Limited of London, Ontario, Canada assembled and installed the window.
This window given in memory of Harry and Marion Shore, depicts The Sower in beautiful colours.  The inscription is;
This window given in memory of Harry and Marion Shore, depicts The Sower in beautiful colours. The inscription is; "Whatsoever a man soweth that shall he also reap." This memorial, given by the Shore family, was installed in 1937, manufactured by Robert McCausland of Toronto. Harry & Marion Shore with their six children lived on a farm next to the Kains farm. They were devoted members of St. Anne's. One of their sons, Herbert, bought some land from the Kains and established a farm on what is now known as Shore Road and for years provided St. Anne's Church with cornstalks at Harvest Festival. His second wife, Olive Shore, was a faithful and hard-working member of the church.
Vestibule window.
Vestibule window.
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